giving thanks for microwomen 2 (or, hey, that climate warrior is my grandmother!)

another micronesian woman who attended the 2014 people’s climate march in new york last week was pelenise alofa pilitati.

watch a clip of pelenise in nyc <– here

she arrived in new york after traveling to the arctic as part of a delegation with the president of kiribati, sponsored by greenpeace. the fates of the equatorial coral atolls of kiribati and the icy polar continent of the arctic are irrevocably bound. and the official images released by greenpeace to the press are certainly dramatic. here is one of them:

kiribati president anote tong in the arctic 2014, greenpeace international image, photo by christian aslund

here’s a photograph of pelenise with the president and other members of the kiribati delegation against the same polar  backdrop.

photograph of kiribati delegation to the arctic 2014
photograph of kiribati delegation to the arctic 2014, used here with permission of pelenise alofa pilitati

i first met pelenise a few years ago, when oxfam organized a panel discussion on climate change here in wellington. she was one of the speakers flown in especially for the panel. fiery and eloquent, pelenise was impressive, but she took me by surprise when she turned her focus from the climate change threats facing the atolls of kiribati to the history of environmental destruction and social dislocation caused by phosphate mining on the high island of banaba. as someone with both banaban and kiribati heritage, i was keen to find an opportunity to talk more with pelenise after the panel. before i could open my mouth to introduce myself to her, she grabbed my arm, and exclaimed, “we are family! you should call me kaka. i am your grandmother!” needless to say, i was blown away: already in awe of this climate warrior and now she was telling me that in banaban kinship terms, she was my grandmother??!!

as pelenise and i talked, i realized that although i had not met her while i was growing up, she had grown up around my father and aunts and uncles on rabi in fiji. i had, however, met her sister roere when i visited nauru in 1997. i had thought of roere as another aunt, and she had been very kind to me on nauru, even staying in touch and sending me gifts when i returned to fiji. roere had struggled on nauru to support her diabetic husband until he died and she eventually joined him from complications with the disease herself. as my dad explained to me later, my great-grandfather was cousins with pelenise and roere’s mother. and that’s how they are technically my grandmothers.

after we met in wellington, i was excited to get to hear pelenise speak once more, this time at the 2010 pasifika festival in auckland. i think you can even hear me cheering in the background of this clip!

i like this clip because pelenise really encourages pacific people to get informed about the issues around climate change, and most importantly, start discussing them amongst our families and communities. you often hear people criticizing ‘all talk and no action’. gee, what i’d give for even some talk about climate change amongst pacific people in aotearoa new zealand!

those familiar with the languages of the pacific will have noticed that pelenise’s name is much more polynesian sounding than micronesian. it is in fact a tuvaluan name, from her father’s side of the family. tuvalu, of course, is as much on the front-line of climate change effects as kiribati; but tuvalu is classified as polynesian, and kiribati micronesian. in future posts, i’ll address some of the issues that surround the melanesian, micronesian and polynesian geo-political and cultural categories that have come to mean both so much and so little in our big ocean. in the meantime, i bask in the fiery glory of my grandmother, and give thanks for another microwoman.

giving thanks for microwomen 2 (or, hey, that climate warrior is my grandmother!)

3 thoughts on “giving thanks for microwomen 2 (or, hey, that climate warrior is my grandmother!)

  1. […] victoria’s and milañ’s work, of course, remind me of the work of their respective compatriots pelenise alofa pilitati (from kiribati) and kathy jet nil-kijiner (from the marshall islands), both of whom i have blogged about: giving thanks for microwomen  and giving thanks for microwomen 2 (or, hey, that climate warrior is my grandmother!) […]

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